CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 67% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

The hikkake pattern

The Hikkake pattern was first described by Daniel L. Chesler and is used to identify possible turning points in the market.

An Hikkake pattern consists of two candles. The first candle must always be an inside candle. An inside candle is a candle which is smaller than the previous candle i.e. it lies 'inside' the previous candle. In the case of a short sell signal (bearish Hikkake) the second candle should have a higher high and higher low than the inside candle. In the case of a long signal (bullish Hikkake) the second candle needs to have a lower low and a lower high than the inside candle.

In order to open a short position when a signal appears, a stop sell order is placed on the low of the first candle in the pattern. In order to buy a position when a long signal appears, a stop buy order is placed on the high of the first candle in the pattern.

This example shows a buy signal (bullish Hikkake). Notice the inside candle and the lower low and the lower high of the signal candle.


This example shows a short sell signal (bearish Hikkake). Notice the inside candle and the higher high and the higher low of the signal candle.


Thanks to Gordon Gekko theeviltrader.com for providing part of the Express code in the forum.